Wednesday, July 14

Another Item For the "Right Speech" List


From dictionary.com:
equivocation \E*quiv`o*ca"tion\, n. a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth [syn: evasion]

No more of that. In the past, I have kept silent or hidden behind this very sort of re-purposing of language (usually for the sake of tact, to avoid hurting feelings, or because I was afraid of starting an argument). There has to be a better way, one that avoids equivocation while at the same time avoiding hurt feelings or needless argumentation.

"Monks, a statement endowed with five factors is well-spoken, not ill-spoken. It is blameless & unfaulted by knowledgeable people. Which five?

"It is spoken at the right time. It is spoken in truth. It is spoken affectionately. It is spoken beneficially. It is spoken with a mind of good-will.

"A statement endowed with these five factors is well-spoken, not ill-spoken. It is blameless & unfaulted by knowledgeable people."
--AN V.198, Vaca Sutta

The last item in that list of five, "spoken with a mind of good will," indicates the need for sustaining metta practice beyond the sitting period and keeping it in mind during social interactions as well.

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